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Blog: Arts Ed Now- Local Action, Collective Impact

 

This June the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership took part in Sustainable Jersey’s 2017 Sustainability Summit, held at The College of New Jersey. A spirit of collaboration filled the air, as the theory of collective impact was made tangible during the one-day Summit. Sessions throughout the afternoon featured varied topics such as coding for community, complete streets, and strategies to support local sustainability initiatives. The advantages of working collectively toward common goals were evident throughout the Summit. And in The Art of Sustainability: Turning Creativity into Problem Based Solutions the benefits were writ large.

A showcase of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) teaching and learning, the session was intended to highlight “examples from participating schools using integrated Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math to prepare the next generation of sustainability leaders”. The panelists represented many organizations that have led efforts related to STEAM throughout New Jersey. Heather McCall, Sustainable Jersey for Schools Program Director, and Mary M. Reece, Director of Special Projects, Foundation for Educational Administration, introduced the new iSTEAM actions that will soon be part of the Sustainable Jersey for Schools program. Jackie Knox, Education Program Associate, Young Audiences New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania and Adrienne R. Hill, Principal, Hedgepeth/Williams Middle School of the Arts, spoke about the impact of STEAM learning on student achievement and school climate. Hill described her school as a place to foster hope and joy through arts learning. Their stories were paired with photos and videos, revealing students captivated by arts learning. The photos of students immersed in creative experimentation, critical thinking, and problem solving spoke volumes!

The Art of Sustainability concluded by connecting to Arts Ed Now, New Jersey’s statewide arts education public awareness campaign, and a demonstration of the many resources that are available at www.artsednow.org. Many of us have grown to love the familiar Arts Ed Now rally cry, “Active creative learning is good for all students, and good for New Jersey! Let’s Do More.” Robust arts programs foster active creative learning, which is one of the first principles of iSTEAM. In practice, rigorous integrative STEAM learning is known to “stimulate student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking” that can be applied to real world challenges outside the classroom.

As the Arts Ed Now ambassadors continue to spread the campaign message, the collective impact of the work grows more evident. When each of us asks, “How might my local action advance collective goals?” we increase the possibility of making new connections between our efforts and the efforts of others. The art of sustainability is that of local action and collective impact. To echo a favorite rally cry…Let’s Do More!

 

 

BLOG: Lessons in Dance to Help Choreograph Your Future

The Paramus High School Dance Departments’ Power of The Dance 4- Concert on June 1, 2017 was filled with a collection of intriguing pieces of choreography which educated, inspired and ignited the audiences imagination. Each piece reflected on our history, past and shared our hopes for our future.  As a dance educator and choreographer, it is my mission to use the art of Dance as powerful tool that is beyond entertainment; conveying stories and meaningful messages about ourselves and the world around us.

This year Dance at PHS was filled with so many exciting and amazing opportunities in Dance and for our community. The Paramus Chamber of Commerce Dream Grant Foundation provided us with a grant supporting my Broadway Meets The Artist Dream Grant.This generous grant provided students with full day professional dance experiences in New York participating Broadway Classroom Step by Step Workshops for An American In Paris & Hamilton as well as attended An American In Paris and Paramour on Broadway. Dancers were able to meet cast members, learn original choreography and participate in Q & A sessions sharing their wisdom from the field. We were also fortunate to have guest artists Laurena Barros, Former Rockette for a Precision Kick Line Workshop and Kid Glyde from Broadway Dance Center for a Hip Hop & Break Dancing Workshop. During holiday season The Spartanettes began a new tradition “Sharing The Gift Of Dance” assembly programs performing at all schools district wide in addition to our Annual Holiday Concert. Dancers and I also visited NJPAC twice this year to see live professional performances of Ballet Hispanico and Alvin Ailey Dance Theater and participate in professional workshops with Dance New Jersey. In April, another magical moment , was a collaborative performance sharing the stage with Mr. Donellan and The Wind Ensemble bringing An American In Paris to life on stage for our K-12 Arts Festival. This year’s Power of Dance concert featured original pieces of choreography created by our Dance Honor students. Each piece was created to raise awareness about particular social issues our youth face today, part of our Dance for Democracy and Social Consciousness Unit. Throughout the evening concert, students shared mission statements as well beautiful dances about 9/11, Bullying, Body Image and Adversity. As well as performed Identity, a piece honoring the Holocaust, which was inspired by the poem I Am A Jew by Franz Bass , from the book I Never Saw Another Butterfly– Children’s Drawings and Poems from Terezin Concentration Camp, 1942-1944. We were beyond proud of Senior, Emily Pagano, 2017 Governor’s Award in Arts Education for Excellence in Artistry & Leadership in Dance; who performed her solo work to Maya Angelous’s poem “Still I Rise” in her mission statement she shared…”Confucius once said, “our greatest glory is not in never failing, but rising in every time we fall,” this couldn’t be any closer to what I focused on when choreographing my piece too Still I Rise. I created this piece to let people know it’s okay to fall. We live in a world where people have this preconceived idea that to fall, is to be weak. However, I’m here to let you know that it’s not the struggle that determines your inner strength, it is your willingness to rise from the fall.” The evening concluded with all dancers performing to an instrumental version of Imagine, utilizing sign language and dance to convey powerful message of unity.

 It has been amazing year for the Dance Department that has reaffirmed the” Power of Dance” as a universal language that all can comprehend. Thank you to Paramus Board of Education, Dance New Jersey, Dance New Jersey-Dance PLC, Arts Ed Now and all the dancers for your endless hard work , dedication and commitment to the Dance program and Arts Education. Nietzsche said, “We should consider each day lost in which we have not danced at least once.” For me, everyday has been found.

All of these amazing experiences inspired me to write a poem- Lessons In Dance To Help Choreograph Your Future- embodying the meaning of “power of Dance” and what we as Dance Educators are really teaching ! (see poem attached below)

Hope you enjoy !

 

– Claudine Ranieri

Dance Educator

Paramus High School

Early Childhood & LEAP Dance Programs

Artistic Director of The Spartanettes

 

 

Lessons in Dance to Help Choreograph Your Future

Blog: A Message to the 2017 Governor’s Awards in Arts Education Nominees From Past Winners! Good Luck!

The Governor’s Award in Arts Education has special significance to each winner.

This month, NJAEP features two messages that were written for the 2017 nominees. Each speaks to the confidence, courage, and perseverance developed through the arts. Enjoy!


My name is Morgan Mastrangelo and I won two Governor’s Awards in the spring of 2016; one in Choral Music and one in Opera. I remember being thrilled to win one after being nominated in 2015 and falling short, but when I heard I had won a second one I really couldn’t believe it! I had no expectations going into the ceremony but remember being very impressed with the state building in Trenton, the reception afterward and of course, being surrounded by all that talent. I was honored to be invited to sing the National Anthem to kick off the ceremony and I remember how gratifying it felt to walk across that stage to receive my awards—a culmination of 4 years of really hard work.

Since then, I was accepted to Northwestern University where I am a Freshman in their (classical) Vocal Performance program. I was also selected to join their Musical Theatre Certificate Program. In my spare time I sing in the co-ed a cappella group, The Undertones, am involved in a student-run theatre group which writes and produces their own musical every year and was recently cast in two campus musicals: as JD in “Heathers: The Musical” and as Jon in “Tick, Tick Boom!”. This summer I was selected to perform at the New York Musical Theatre Festival and then I will be participating in an Opera and workshop back at Northwestern.  I am very busy, but so happy to be doing what I love and performing across all genres of music.

My advice to future awardees is to keep doing what you love! Obviously, if you have earned a Governor’s Award you have the talent–now keep going and don’t let anything stand in your way. I definitely think that my two Governor’s awards gave me (and my parents) extra confidence in my abilities and solidified my choice to continue my studies in music after High School. Good Luck!!

Sincerely,

Morgan


Winning the 2015 New Jersey Governor’s Award in Art Education — Multidiscipline has enabled me to follow my dreams and keep an open mind about what I’ll be doing in the future.  I never realized how much confidence the Governor’s Award would give me.  It has encouraged me to pursue a wide array of interests as well as reap rewards that I never thought possible.

This year, in addition to art opportunities and competition awards, I was so excited to be accepted to a week-long national advocacy institute in Washington, D.C. I also received a federal scholarship to study Mandarin in China for seven weeks while living with a host family.  Sometimes I feel this isn’t real since I’m still a junior in high school!

The most important intangible I received from the Governor’s Award in Arts Education, but never expected, is the courage to persevere — especially when not reaching goals the first time around — and the resilience to redouble my efforts, reapply myself and seek new opportunities.

What do I think the Governor’s Award can mean for you?  It means that you too can follow your heart and your dreams can really come true!!!

Sincerely,
David Jansen


I was awarded the 2016 New Jersey Music Educators Association (NJMEA) Master Music Teacher Award. When I attended the 2016 Governor’s Awards Ceremony, the amazingly talented students blew me away. By watching them, it inspired and rejuvenated me as a teacher. It reminded me that my young students can aspire to be a recipient of a Governor’s Award. I am so honored to have been a recipient and will continue to work diligently at creating a musically successful and inspiring classroom environment so that my students can be a recipient of this award some day.

Since the awards, our performing arts program at Far Hills Country Day School was named as one of the recipients of the NAMM SupportMusic Merit Award (SMMA) for 2017. The NAMM Foundation each year selects individual schools with excellent music education programs to receive the SMMA. We were very honored to be selected as one of only 92 schools in the entire country to receive this recognition.

My advice for future awardees is to keep doing what you are doing. If you love it, that is all that matters. Life is short. Find what you love to do, whether it is performing, singing, writing, acting, drawing, painting, etc, and live your life to the fullest. This country needs the fine arts, the visual arts, the performing arts, and other creative fields, to keep the creativity alive.

Sincerely,

Amy

2017 National Arts Advocacy Day

This year’s National Arts Advocacy Day in Washington, DC had an undercurrent of energy that came from word that the President had proposed, just days earlier, elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts for FY2018. Over 700 people attended National Arts Advocacy Day sponsored by Americans for the Arts, and New Jersey’s delegation of 40, coordinated by ArtPride NJ, was the largest in NJ history. There were veterans who had attended previous years with of training and visiting the offices of NJ congressional representatives, and many who were first timers, learning facts and figures and understanding how best to make the case for federal support of the arts and humanities. We learned about how NEA funding affects the arts in New Jersey, and from each other we learned not to fear the short time allotted for advocating, but how to make the best use of that time with fresh approaches to storytelling.

In advance of the convening, ArtPride held a webinar for attendees to answer questions and explain the two-day event that included intensive advocacy training along with the Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts and Public Policy, this year presented by Darren Walker, President of the Ford Foundation. Mr. Walker’s powerful remarks were compelling and portrayed how he became familiar with the arts as a child, perusing art magazines that his mother brought home from her job as a domestic in a wealthy household where attending cultural performances was a part of life, far removed from his own experience. He emphasized what we all felt deeply as arts advocates–that the arts are not a special interest, but a national interest that strengthens who we are.

Besides saving and increasing funding for the national cultural agencies, policy issues included arts education and support of all arts disciplines as part of a “well-rounded education” stipulated in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Representatives who are not currently part of the Congressional STEAM Caucus were invited to show their support for the arts in STEM by joining over 75 other members. The fact that arts programs are now eligible for through ESSA for Title 1 funds and other federal resources, was also stressed to elected officials.

If you were not able to attend National Arts Advocacy Day, there is still action you can take to help #SavetheNEA. The federal budget process is a long one that extends throughout the summer months to come. Visit ArtPride NJ’s online NEA toolkit for data on NEA grants in New Jersey, and information that will inform your personal communication with members of US Congress. From email to postcards to phone calls to social media, there are plenty of ways to keep this message alive and assure that federal funding remains in the budget and will help New Jersey arts programs continue to grow and thrive.

 

Ann Marie Miller

Director of Advocacy & Public Policy

ArtPride New Jersey Foundation

Blog: March is NJ TEEN ARTS COUNTY FESTIVAL Time!

This March begins the kickoff of the Teen Arts Festival circuit in New Jersey. Individual counties across New Jersey host local Teen Arts Festivals showcasing the literary, performing and visual talents of the resident teen artists. At these county festivals the students receive constructive feedback from professional artists. In addition to the showcasing of creative work students are able to partake in workshops where they can discover new art forms and learn more about their already dedicated art forms. Outstanding students from local Teen Arts Festival are nominated to represent their home county by showcasing their creative talents on the state level at the New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival on May 31st, June 1st and June 2nd   at Ocean County College in Toms River, NJ. The New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival is the culminating celebration and showcase of talented teen artists from all across the state of New Jersey.

The New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival strives to create a greater community amongst the arts educators and student artists them to come together is this state-wide celebration. At the New Jersey State Festival State Festival by offering Master Class Workshops for students, a College Fair, Special Guest Performances, and Professional Development Credits for Teachers. Junior and/or seniors who showcase their work are eligible to receive a $1,000 scholarship to further their education.

In addition to the day of festivities offered by the New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival efforts are being made now to help create a New Jersey Teen Artist Network by hosting the “Express Yourself Contests” where students can post their literary, performing and visual works on the New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival Facebook page: www.facebook.com/NJTEENARTS. Students can win a $25 Gift Card by posting their creative work and receiving the most likes for their Facebook post.

The New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival is also proud to announce the sponsorship provided by the New Jersey Education Association! The NJEA sponsorship combined with the sponsorship of the Jay and Linda Grunin Foundation is sure to make the New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival the premier state-wide celebration of the arts in education!

Nominations are currently being sought for the Arts Educator of the Year Award presented by The New Jersey Education Association and the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. This award has been established to honor an outstanding Arts Educator who has made a significant impact on their students, school district and community. The award includes the honor of the title along with a $3,500 stipend. The award recipient will be honored at the New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival on May 31st. Nominations can be made by school principals and arts supervisors. Visit: www.njteenarts.com/aey to submit nominations virtually and/or download the paper form.

Please head out and support your local County Teen Arts Festivals this March as well as those in the coming months leading up the New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival. Be sure to ask your County Teen Arts Coordinator about student nominations and overall participation for the New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival taking place at Ocean County College in Toms River, NJ on May 31st, June 1st and June 2nd 2017! We love to see you there! Visit: www.njteenarts.com to learn more and be sure to follow New Jersey State Teen Arts Festival on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat and YouTube : @NJTEENARTS

     

Harrison H. Haney
NJ State Teen Arts Coordinator

Blog: From Armenia With Love


The most important life lessons I have ever learned came from my music teacher in Yerevan, Armenia. When I was fifteen, Rita Israelovna Petrosian was my music theory and solfege teacher. Soft-spoken and kind, Rita Israelovna was a brilliant musician, hard-working single mother, and most importantly, a remarkable teacher. She encouraged curiosity in her students. She taught us how to connect the most complicated music theory concepts to the real life. She pushed us to be the best we could possibly be and made each and every one of us believe in ourselves. But the most important lesson I learned from her is that with passion, drive and hard work, anything is possible.


One of my first projects was about a musical form. As I started digging deep into the topic of my choice, the prelude form, I got excited to learn about the
evolution of this form and before I knew it, my project turned into a research paper. Flipping through sixty pages of my handwritten work, Rita Israelovna gradually raised her eyebrows in an amusement, gasped, slowly looked at me and said: “Բալիկ ձան (my dear child), there is nothing you cannot accomplish if you work hard.” I stood there in wonder. What does she mean? Why is she saying this

Day after day, Rita Israelovna made me work harder than I could have ever imagined. She gave me the toughest assignments and expected more from me than from any other student in that class. She knew right away I was hungry for challenges, so she accepted her own challenge of supporting me in my passionate journey of discovering music and what it meant to me. She encouraged and helped me in my struggles, making sure I never lost faith in myself. Three years later, I became a student in the dream school for anyone pursuing a music career, Moscow Conservatory. Rita Israelovna changed my life in the most profound and insightful way.

Music teachers have a unique platform to inspire and influence their students because the power of music is penetrating and everlasting. Music is the force that keeps me going, and this force motivates me to inspire my students to stay strong and never give up. Music’s transformative power is evident in the way my students grow and mature, and it gives me pure joy to watch them blossom. Through music, I teach my students to recognize beauty, have more love, compassion, respect, integrity and understanding. Through music, I teach my students how to be truly human.

As a State Teacher of the Year, a mother and a musician, I want to thank all my colleagues in the Arts Education for making this world a better place by bringing beauty, passion and love to our students. We should never forget what got us into education and why we do what we do every day. We should always remember that we have an enormous power to influence our students. Let’s not take a single day for granted but use it as an opportunity to help our students discover their passions and help them use the power of their dreams to find their voices.


Twenty-two years later after my graduation from Conservatory, I received a package in the mail from one of my classmates, Gohar, now a movie director and a producer. It was titled, “From Armenia with Love.” My heart palpitated as I unwrapped the protective bubble paper and discovered a VCR video. The video contained Rita Israelovna’s last interview, only a year before she passed away. In that interview, she was asked to name the proudest accomplishment of her career. “Argine Safari,” she said. “Argine inspired me to be the best teacher I could possibly be.” Tears came down my face as I thought of all that Rita Israelovna did for
me… You taught me that with passion and hard work, anything is possible. You taught me that my dreams and goals were worth all the hard work and pain. You taught me that music can change the world. Rita Israelovna, I am forever grateful to you.

Guest Blog Written By:

Mrs. Argine Safari
2016-2017 New Jersey State Teacher of the Year
State of New Jersey Department of Education

Blog: Arts Horizons Stands Alongside NJAEP

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Arts Horizons stands alongside the NJAEP in the campaign for #artsednow! Not only do we believe in the movement to support Arts Education in our communities, we wish to raise our voice in advocacy. For nearly 40 years, Arts Horizons enhances the lives of people of all ages and abilities by creating equitable opportunities to engage the arts. Arts Horizons believes in the power of the arts to enhance learning across disciplines and environments. We value the central role of artists and their work in our society.

In support of the campaign for #artsednow, we have activated our social media channels including facebook, twitter and Instagram. Social media allows us to share information, access news and opportunities in the field, and network with our community of peer partners who all stand committed to arts-in-education for our students and communities.

We are grateful for the help of Mr. Delroy Lindo, Actor, Theater Director and friend to Arts Horizons. In 2012 he was the honoree at the Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center where he received the Distinguished Career in the Arts & Powerful Presence as a Role Model award. Mr. Lindo jumped right on board to share his voice, and invite the support of “The Good Wife’s ” Cush Jumbo – soon to be featured in the show’s spinoff “The Good Fight” on CBS.

Please enjoy our recent blog post for more details at #ARTSEDNOW – Or for more information contact Dena Malarek, Program Director – dena@artshorizons.org

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Guest Blog: Timothy Craig 2016 Recipient of NJPSA’s Visionary Supervisor of the Year award

Guest Blog by: Timothy Craig
Director of Fine & Performing Arts and Business Education
Bayonne Public Schools

2016 Recipient of the NJPSA’s Visionary Supervisor of the Year award

My procrastination prevented me from working on this blog sooner. I wanted desperately to be profound, witty, insightful and worthy of the award I was so generously given this year. The truth is I do not think that I can be any of that. Simply put – I am an educator who loves education and will continue to devote my life to making the lives of students better. It is my hope that by promoting arts and business education that the Bayonne public school district will graduate better human beings who are prepared to meet the challenges of their colleges, careers, and ultimately to become the citizens we all want them to be.

Though the road is not always easy as we strive for relevance, funding, and support in an age of standardized testing, statistics, and data driven decisions, arts educators and supporters of arts education know that the fight is always worth fighting. When curricular classroom time for the arts is limited, we have looked for creative solutions to fill the void for our students – and our district now offers multiple extra curricular and Saturday programs in music, theater, and dance. These programs are accessible and affordable for all of the students in the city of Bayonne, and they are an important piece of our department goal to bring instruction in music, visual art, theater and dance to all students in grades Pre-K through 12.

The success of our curricular and extracurricular programs lies only in part with me, but mostly with the hard working, passionate and dedicated educators who teach these courses. I can truly say that the staff of the Fine & Performing Arts Department in Bayonne works tirelessly, giving so much of their talents and time to develop these programs. Like me, my staff recognizes the long lasting positive impact arts education will have on their students, and it is an honor to work alongside such talented educators towards our collective vision for arts education in Bayonne.

I am not suggesting that Bayonne will turn out hundreds of Picassos, Baryshnikovs or DeNiros, but I can say with confidence that we will educate human beings that will go out into the world prepared to use the immense power of the arts to bring people together, calling on the things that connect us rather than those that divide us.

I believe education is the most important element necessary to eliminate poverty, improve the health and sciences, and continue to build, discover and create. I believe the arts can surpass divisions in language, culture, theology and politics. To that end, I will passionately continue to fight for arts programs and support educators and education worldwide.

BLOG: Thank an Art Teacher! with Ann Marie Miller, ArtPride NJ.

When I think back over my 30+ year career in the arts I wonder, “Who is responsible for jumpstarting my love of the arts?” I often credit a high school teacher, Edith Henig, for requiring her class to keep a daily sketchbook. Mrs. Henig reviewed sketchbooks weekly, and mine contained what would now be considered doodles–over interpreted paisley and flowers reminiscent of Jefferson Starship album covers. Mrs. Henig left handwritten comments like “keep at it,” or “fantastic, you’re doing a great job!” Whether or not this was true, her notes certainly prompted me to continue and paved the road to pursuing the arts more seriously throughout high school.

I was lucky to be a student at East Brunswick High School, now designated a NJ model school of the arts, with amazing art teachers—Ken and Judy Koppel, Bill Murphy, Bill Marsh, Roy Risley, and Bette Lerner, teaching commercial art, printmaking, drawing and painting, ceramics and jewelry making. It was the 70’s and EBHS was way ahead of its time in developing an exemplary arts curriculum, and while I was there I had no idea they were trailblazers. I just knew art class was a place where I felt at home. There were 650 students in my graduating class, so it was easy to get lost in the shuffle, but not in the art room. At the same time, chorus was practicing down the hall in Building 3, and the now infamous Elliott Taubenslag, “Mr. T,” was coaching young drama students for the next EBHS theater production. It was art nirvana.

Before East Brunswick High School, I was a Catholic school student where art was poster contests and interpreting classic masterpieces, “picture studies” on postcards with essays. The Bernadine sisters were not big on art, but my penmanship remains testimony to their academic priorities. Back then it was my Mom who helped me with poster contests and reports on lives of the saints complete with statuary photos of all 12 apostles. Mom really was my first art teacher and loved painting—oil painting, ceramics, and up until her dying days a master of amazing needlepoint and crewel embroidery that grace my household today, so there was osmosis at work at an early age.

Post high school I entered Moore College of Art and Design, and Moore graced me with outstanding art educators including the late Deborah Warner who showed me that you can be an educator and maintain an accomplished artistic career as a fiber artist. I majored in Art Education with a goal to become an art teacher back at EBHS. That wasn’t in the cards, though I taught for a few years both privately and at 2 public high schools. There were other mentors yet to come to mold a career in public service.

During this season of thanksgiving, please thank an art teacher when you consider all who make a difference in the lives of students. You never know where their influence will lead, but you can safely bet that their creativity will breed an appreciation for beauty, discipline, skill, constructive criticism, history and much more that form the fiber of personal values and will carry them through their adult lives.

BLOG: Arts Ed Now – Local Heroes Spotlight

This September, in schools throughout New Jersey there was added cause for excitement amid the usual flurry of activity that marks the start of the school year. During National Arts in Education Week, September 12-17, students, parents, teachers, arts administrators, school leaders, and others joined together in celebration of the official launch of the Arts Ed Now campaign. Excitement for the campaign message continued to gain momentum during the week-long, statewide celebration. Enthusiastic ambassadors took to the internet to communicate their support. Photos and video were Shared, Liked and ReTweeted! Through various social media channels the “ArtsEdNow” hashtag reached millions of unique viewers.

Many organizations were eager to voice support for the chief campaign goal—increasing student participation in arts education. The collection of Local Heroes featured on the Arts Ed Now website is just a small sample of the mighty support and attention the Arts Ed Now campaign has received. By taking the lead, a marvelous group of dedicated champions served as shining examples. East Brunswick High School, Young Audiences NJ & Eastern PA, the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, and the New Jersey Education Association, are just a few of the Local Heroes that have inspired many more. You can find all Local Heroes stories here.

Participating in the launch enabled individuals and organizations to raise awareness about Arts Ed Now and to connect with others who feel it is important that all school districts in New Jersey provide students with robust arts education programs. A poll conducted by the Eagleton Center for Public Interest Polling at Rutgers revealed that 95% of NJ residents believe arts education is important for K-12 students, and only 30% have taken action to support arts education. Fortunately, with the launch of the Arts Ed Now campaign, residents now have many of the tools that are needed in order for coordinated, sustained action to take place.

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Stay tuned for updates and check campaign central often (weekly, daily…or hourly!) to see what is taking place across the state. The website, www.artsednow.org, will continue to highlight the ongoing advocacy efforts of ambassadors throughout the multi-year campaign in New Jersey. You will also see ways to connect to the national network of advocates that remain active on social media. For example, this October, in honor of  Arts and Humanities month, we invite you to continue expressing your support for the arts by joining the Americans for the Arts #showyourart social media campaign. Highlight works of art from the daily theme graphic, using the hashtags #artsednow and #showyourart.

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Arts Ed Now launched this September, but it will be part of New Jersey’s schools and communities for years to come!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 12, 2017
The Beat E-Newsletter: June 2017

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