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2017 SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATE SURVEY RESULTS

Arts Ed NJ recognizes that understanding candidates’ views on arts education is important to voters. A healthy arts education ecosystem depends on many factors, and support of arts education by school board members represents a critical part of the ecosystem. Their support contributes to the thriving programs, student performances and memorable arts events that shape our communities.

As part of the ArtsEdNow campaign, Arts Ed NJ previously known as the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership conducted the 2017 New Jersey School Board Candidate Survey on Arts Education. All 2,000 candidates for School Board across New Jersey were contacted and invited to share their views about arts education with the voters in their district. Many candidates provided detailed responses to the questions. Some of the candidates vividly described their own experiences with the arts.The survey was conducted as a public service, to help voters make informed decisions.

SEE THE FULL RESULTS HERE

With the November election just around the corner, please consider passing along this information to others. Help us spread the word!

Arts Ed Summit 2017

Join with arts education thought leaders for this one-day exploration of the status of arts education in New Jersey’s schools and help craft the pathway forward to universal arts education for all students across the state.

2017 NJ Arts Education Census Project

AS NEW JERSEY APPROACHES ‘UNIVERSAL ACCESS’ TO ARTS EDUCATION, STUDENT PARTICIPATION IN THE ARTS INCREASED TO 76%

Third Installment of the New Jersey Arts Education Census Project Reveals Only 11% of Students Have Access to All Four Arts Disciplines



WARREN, N.J. – Widely acknowledged as a national leader in arts education, New Jersey is now reaching the point of “universal access” to arts education for all students, according to a new research study by Arts Ed NJ as part of the New Jersey Arts Education Census Project. The census report, ARTS ED NOW: Every Child, Every School revealed that during the 2015/2016 school year, 99% of New Jersey schools representing 99.4% of students provided arts education.

The census also showed that only 26 schools statewide (serving 9,160 students) reported offering no arts instruction, a dramatic reduction from a decade ago when more than 77,000 students did not have access. Once universal access is achieved, New Jersey will be the first state in the nation to be able to make this claim, according to Robert Morrison, director, Arts Ed NJ, which co-sponsored the census. However, while statewide arts education access is broad, only 11% of students enjoy access to all four arts disciplines – dance, music, theater and visual art – as required by state code.

There is more positive news: Seventy-six percent of all students (nearly 1 million) participated in one or more arts education offering during the census year, including 93% of elementary, 86% of middle and 46% of high school students. Overall participation has shown steady gains, increasing by 11%, or more than 105,000 students since 2011, and 140,000 students since 2006. Likewise, Per-Pupil Arts Spending (PPAS) has increased by 12% in elementary and middle schools and 15% in high schools since 2011.

“This report shows how educators and communities are working hard to provide all students access to arts education,” said New Jersey Education Commissioner Kimberley Harrington. “By working to engage all students with high-quality arts education across the state, we are giving our students more opportunities to use their voice of creativity and providing them skills that will help them be successful beyond high school.”

Morrison cautions that more work needs to be done, noting that there are still more than 80,000 elementary and middle school students who should be participating in the arts (based on state policies) that are not, as well as another 40,000 or so high school students who could also be participating that are not.

Moreover, when it comes to per-pupil arts spending and student/arts teacher ratios, the census revealed that both measures are more favorable in schools serving more affluent populations – something not found a decade ago.

“This is an equity issue of great importance, centered on the significant documented benefits provided through active participation in arts education,” said Morrison. “In a world where imagination, creativity and innovation are sculpting our future, ensuring we provide the inspiration for these skills for all students must be our goal.”

The New Jersey Arts Education Census Project is a collaborative partnership with the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, the New Jersey Department of Education, the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, Arts Ed NJ, ArtPride New Jersey Foundation and Quadrant Research. ARTS ED NOW: Every Child, Every School is the follow-up report to the nationally acclaimed 2007 and 2012 reports, Within Our Power: The Progress, Plight and Promise of Arts Education for Every Child and Keeping the Promise: Arts Education for Every Child, The Distance Traveled – The Journey Remaining. The release coincides with the expansion of the Arts Ed Now statewide public awareness campaign to raise the visibility of arts education in schools and communities, and comes on the heels of a Rutgers-Eagleton Poll released last week showing that most New Jerseyans believe that arts education is important for all students.

Other key findings of the third census include:

  • More than 83,000 elementary and middle school students who should be participating in arts education (based on state requirements for elementary and middle school students) do not.
  • Participation in art (69%) and music (62%) were highest among the four arts disciplines. Visualart and music are also the most widely available of the arts disciplines, at 94% and 96%, respectively. Only 6% of schools offer all four arts disciplines, as required by state policy.
  • Per-Pupil Arts Spending (PPAS) increases as poverty levels (measured by free and reduced-pricelunch and District Factor Groups) decrease. Additionally, as chronic absenteeism increases, PPAS decreases.
  • There are 8,046 arts educators employed state-wide. There are 3,521 visual art, 3,864 music,420 theater and 241 dance educators state-wide.
  • The overall student-to-arts-teacher ratio is 162:1. For visual art, the ratio is 377:1; for dance, itis 5,713:1; for music, it is 333:1; for theater, it is 3,199:1. The ratio becomes less favorable as the percentage of students receiving free/reduced price lunch or the level of chronic absenteeism increases.
  • Ninety-three percent of all schools in the state participate in some cultural activity. Thisincludes field trips (83%), assemblies (69%), long-term partnerships (28%) and artist-in- residencies (17%). These represent declines in all categories since 2006. The majority of schools (65%) engage in two or more cultural activities. However, cultural participation has declined significantly since 2006.
  • Forty-six percent of all schools reported using arts integration. Yet, only 3% of all schools report regularly planning lessons between the arts specialist and the classroom teacher.

“The Arts Education Census data identifies the status and condition of arts education which is so important to our children’s success—both academically and socially,” said Chris Daggett, President and CEO of the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. When it comes to educating our children, everyone has something at stake, and we hope that more New Jerseyans use their voices and the Arts Ed Now campaign tools to ensure that all children from pre-K through high school have access to arts education.

”“Third time’s a charm. Once again, this groundbreaking research has given us something to both celebrate and to shoot for: universal access and universal participation,” states Nick Paleologos, executive director, the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. “But most important, it has underscored New Jersey’s leadership role nationally in arts education advocacy.”

Methodology

All public school principals in New Jersey were required by the Commissioner of Education to provide data on arts education from their school for this Arts Education Census Project. The participation rate is 99.3% of the 2,329 public and charter schools required to take part representing 1,295,466 students. Data were provided by the schools via a special on-line questionnaire to Quadrant Research. The data were then forwarded to Cypress Research for statistical analysis, which forms the basis of this report.

The complete report may be downloaded at http://artsednj.org/2017-arts-education-census/

Individual school information may be found at https://artsednow.org/

Information about the 2017 Rutgers-Eagleton Public Opinion Survey on arts education may be downloaded at http://eagletonpoll.rutgers.edu/rutgers-eagleton-arts-education-nj-sept2017/ 

The Beat: Arts Ed NJ’s Monthly Newsletter – September 2017

September is here and it is going to be a September to remember. In the Arts Education world in New Jersey the next month is beyond busy. Here’s what is happening:

ARTS ED NJ LAUNCHES 2017 SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATES SURVEY

 

September 12, 2017

Contact: Robert Morrison

Email: bob@artsedresearch.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

ARTS ED NJ LAUNCHES 2017 SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATES SURVEY

WARREN, NJ: For the third consecutive year, Arts Ed NJ is conducting a School Board Candidates Survey on Arts Education. The survey provides all candidates running for local School Board the opportunity to share their views about arts education with voters in their district. The 2017 Survey on Arts Education is a public service as part of the ARTS ED NOW campaign.

All 2,003 school board candidates running for election on November 7, 2017 were mailed a letter with instructions for participation in the survey. The deadline for participation is September 29, 2017. All responses will be posted on the Arts Ed NJ website at www.artsednj.org/survey2017 on October 13th.

A statewide network of organizations, including Arts Ed NJ, ArtPride New Jersey, the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, Art Educators of New Jersey, New Jersey Music Educators Association, Dance New Jersey, Speech and Theatre Association of New Jersey and many others will promote the link to thousands of prospective voters. This will provide voters an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of each candidate’s views on arts education.

Arts Ed NJ is the unified voice for arts education in New Jersey. Formerly the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership, Arts Ed NJ was founded in 2007 by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, New Jersey Department of Education and Music for All Foundation, with additional support from the ArtPride New Jersey Foundation. The mission of Arts Ed NJ is to provide a unified voice for a diverse group of constituents who agree on the educational benefits and impact of the arts, specifically the contribution they make to student achievement and a civilized, sustainable society.

Arts Ed Now is a statewide campaign to increase active participation in arts education in all schools in New Jersey. Studies show that students who participate in arts education do better in school and in life. The Arts Ed Now campaign identifies ways to increase participation in arts education and garner public support to put a spotlight on the issue. The campaign is designed to be customized at a local grassroots level for more impact. The “Campaign Central” website www.ArtsEdNow.org features stories, tools and ways for citizens to become better ambassadors – together. Arts Ed Now was initiated by Arts Ed NJ, the NJ State Council on the Arts, the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, and Americans for the Arts and now includes hundreds of organizations and individuals across New Jersey.

Arts Ed NJ Statement of Principles

Arts Ed NJ Statement of Principles

2016 School Board Candidate Survey Results

artsednow_links_horiz

The New Jersey Arts Education Partnership recognizes that understanding candidates’ views on arts education is important to voters. A healthy arts education ecosystem depends on many factors, and support of arts education by school board members represents a critical part of the ecosystem. Their support contributes to the thriving programs, student performances and memorable arts events that shape our communities.

As part of the ArtsEdNow campaign, the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership conducted the 2016 New Jersey School Board Candidate Survey on Arts Education. All 1,900+ candidates for School Board across New Jersey were contacted and invited to share their views about arts education with the voters in their district. Many candidates provided detailed responses to the questions. Some of the candidates vividly described their own experiences with the arts.The survey was conducted as a public service, to help voters make informed decisions.

SEE THE FULL RESULTS HERE

With the November election just around the corner, please consider passing along this information to others. Help us spread the word!

NEW! Eagleton Poll Shows Statewide Support for Arts Education

ALMOST ALL NEW JERSEYANS BELIEVE ARTS EDUCATION IS IMPORTANT, BUT FEWER HELP TO PROMOTE IT IN SCHOOLS OR COMMUNITIES

“ARTS ED NOW” CAMPAIGN LAUNCHES SEPT 12, 2016

“ARTS ED NOW” CAMPAIGN LAUNCHES SEPT 12, 2016
NJ arts education advocates plan activities across the state to help kick off multi-year initiative to increase participation in arts education in schools.


The NJ-based Arts Ed Now campaign will officially launch on September 12, 2016 during national Arts Education Week – with advocates featuring the initiative at local and statewide levels all week long.

Spurred by the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership (NJAEP), NJ State Council on the Arts, the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, and Americans for the Arts, Arts Ed Now is a multi-year campaign designed to increase participation in arts education in schools across New Jersey.

Studies show that students who participate in arts education do better in school and in life. The longer students are engaged in arts education, the better the outcomes are overall. To heighten the outcomes in New Jersey, Arts Ed Now is focused on increasing participation in every school in the state.

Unfortunately, not all NJ students have the same access to arts education to be able to participate at high levels – or increase existing participation. Despite state education standards, many schools lag behind in offering all four disciplines of dance, music, theater and visual arts.

To achieve better results, the campaign set the following goals by year 2020:
All NJ students will have access to arts education
Increase the number of schools providing more than two art forms
Increase arts participation in elementary and middle schools to 100%
Increase participation in high schools to 60%
Increase school engagement with community resources
Develop a statewide network of local stakeholders

In 1987, Governor Tom Kean signed the law creating the Literacy in the Arts Task Force to examine the state of arts education in New Jersey. “Arts Ed Now is the next generation of advocacy for excellent arts education in our state,” said the former Governor in a statement about the campaign. “I support this campaign and encourage everyone who cares about the future of New Jersey to engage, advocate, and do what you have to do to get results for the benefit of students everywhere.”

Arts Ed Now centers its strategy on helping arts education advocates become good ambassadors to advance the issue forward. Through a statewide network, Arts Ed Now brings people together to share information, stories and best practices for increasing participation in arts education. Local communities provide opportunities to test ideas for advocacy, which then get added to the overall campaign tactics and shared statewide for more powerful results overall.

Additional leadership for the campaign includes: Art Educators of New Jersey, ArtPride NJ, Dance NJ, NJ Department of Education, NJ Music Educators Association., NJ Principals & Supervisors Association/Foundation for Educational Administration., Speech & Theatre Assoc. of NJ, and creative partner Social Impact Studios. Additional partners include the Education Law Center, New Jersey Education Association, New Jersey School Boards Association and the New Jersey PTA. NJTV is a campaign media partner.

“So many people across the state are already doing great work to increase participation in the arts,” said Bob Morrison, Director, NJAEP. “We want to highlight those efforts and build on them to amplify the voices of those who care about arts education as strong local ambassadors with the help of Arts Ed Now.”

One such effort is the pilot community of Newark, NJ. “As a large local community addressing its own arts education needs, the Newark Arts Education Roundtable (NAER) is able to leverage the Arts Ed Now campaign to help ambassadors become even stronger advocates,” said Lauren Meehan, Director, NAER. “We are also able to provide the support as a pilot community to test and refine the statewide campaign tools – in an effort to serve as a model for other communities facing similar challenges as Newark.”

Arts Ed Now will officially launch on September 12, 2016, which coincides with national Arts Education Week. A spotlight focus on activities across the state all week long will provide a springboard for the multi-year initiative.

During lead up to Launch Week, advocates can learn more and download basic campaign materials on the pre-website ArtsEdNow.org. Arts education advocates can also get behind-the-scenes updates now on the Arts Ed Now Facebook Group. Printed materials are also available now for anyone who wants to launch Arts Ed Now in their school, organization or community. Campaign stickers, posters and fact sheets can be requested by e-mailing info@socialimpactstudios.com

The full “campaign central” website will re-launch to kick off Launch Week on September 12th. The full site is designed as an activation hub for everyone involved in promoting the campaign. Visitors to the site can see how their school stacks up in providing arts education and get active right away in the campaign. Practical tools on the site can help ambassadors raise awareness, change policy or create their own local campaign to make change. The site will also provide resources, stories and highlights of ongoing action by local ambassadors.

About the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership
The New Jersey Arts Education Partnership (NJAEP) is the unified voice for arts education in New Jersey. NJAEP was originally founded in 2007 as a cosponsored program of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, with additional support from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, New Jersey Department of Education and Music for All Foundation. Additional support has been provided by the Prudential Foundation, and ArtPride New Jersey Foundation. The mission of the NJAEP is to provide a unified voice for a diverse group of constituents who agree on the educational benefits and impact of the arts, specifically the contribution they make to student achievement and a civilized, sustainable society. Additional information is available at www.artsednj.org.

Download photos and infographics on the relaunched ArtsEdNow.org campaign central website starting September 12th.

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Taking the lead on ArtsEdNow with Michele Russo

I had an opportunity to speak with Michele Russo, President and CEO of Young Audiences New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania. Recently, it came to our attention that YANJEP included information on ArtsEdNow on the back cover of their resource guide. The NJAEP applauds their initiative and wants to share their campaign engagement model with you.

What does ArtsEdNow mean to you?

The great thing is that ArtsEdNow is a rallying cry for everyone who is passionate about arts education. Although many of us come from different points of view on arts education we all are passionately committed to bringing the arts to children in NJ. The strength of ArtsEdNow is that it unites everyone in that message. I think that it has the potential to unite everyone in terms of our messaging. As the staff person for Young Audiences, knowing that we cannot do it all ourselves, but as a field we can do it all. If I look at all of the people who are allies in this, from the teaching artists to the teachers to the principals to our board, they are all coming from a slightly different point of view but they can all have the single vision of arts education being critical to children. It is a way for us to show our strength as a field – it is not about individual organizations – the focus is on us as a field.

As President of YANJ why is this important?

It is important – we are all out there to support our own organizations, we are doing our programming, we are doing our fundraising, we are talking about the work that we do. But everything we do is in the context of the educational landscape of NJ and the field of arts education. Our ability to paint the picture of the context is something that we do and so I think it is import that we are connecting. ArtsEdNow is a way for the field to shine and for everything to be highlighted as whole and not individual entities. ArtsEdNow gives our field a through line.

Why did you decide to include the information in your materials?

We had the space in our resource guide and we wanted it to be seen. We send our resource guide to thousands of school contacts. We also know that so many of our contacts keep their resource guides for a year – they hold on to them. We thought that putting the ArtsEdNow information on the outside cover would be something that people could reconnect with. So if they see it on their kitchen table or see it in the teachers’ lounge and then they get an email there is a cumulative impact when they see the graphic and the messaging. It is a way to make it really visible.

Have you discussed the campaign with your Board or teaching artists?

We have discussed it with our Board. They are very aware of it. We have built advocacy into our strategic plan as part of how we do our work. It has always been there because we are members of ArtPride and sit on the NJAEP Steering Committee but as a Board we now have it in print that this is part of what we do. With the ArtsEdNow campaign we are devoting the September Board meeting to focusing on how a Board can be stronger advocates for arts education. We chose September because that is when the launch is happening. We also wanted to allow enough time to be thoughtful about how to engage our Board – some have children in schools some are retired some are educators– it is a diverse group of people. We wanted to give them enough time to get engaged and decide what are the key things a board can do to support this work.

Young Audiences is taking the lead on campaign engagement, do you see this as your role?

As one of the biggest arts education organizations in NJ we feel that it is incumbent on us to look at how we can provide leadership on advocacy and if there are models. We hope that out of the September board meeting come models and activities on how Boards can be engaged and share that with our colleagues. We may have a bit more capacity than some smaller organizations to focus on this so we want to take advantage of that. We are also part of a national organization – they are very aware of this campaign – and we do see the potential to share out with the network how their board, staff, teaching artists–the whole organization – how do they get involved in advocacy. We have a huge bonus in NJ as we have ArtPride and the Arts Education Partnership – not every YA affiliate has those organizations. There is something in us that makes us feel responsible and want to share our learning with others in the network.

What do you plan to do the week of Sept 12?

We are putting our plans together right now.

We have our Showcases coming up in September and that is an opportunity to see many parents. We are putting together our plans for what we can do there.

More to follow. More to share.

Thank you Michele. Thank you Young Audiences.

 

 

 

 

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November 10, 2017
The Beat: Arts Ed NJ’s Monthly Newsletter – November 2017

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